Leadership credit Hillary Clinton | letter

It had been all quiet on the Hillary-Donald front in the post-election battle for attention. Hillary was grieving, pushing her book. “It is tempting to take a step back and assess the results of 2016,” wrote Ellen Fein and Jim Walsh in The New Republic. “Donald Trump has been a president for whom Democrats could never have possibly planned.” But Hillary still wanted the ball, so Hillary worked hard to influence what the man who beat her would do and with whom he would work. If he’d remained president, Hillary would have been vice-president: she would have been on her way to leading a centrist coalition for Medicare for All, universal preschool, single-payer health care, and paid family leave – a movement powered by the power of Clinton’s grassroots campaign and coalition of workers, farmers, women, students, and other activists in and outside the Democratic party. As things stand now, Dems will have Donald Trump to deal with and will lead a congressional majority with powerful House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler as its chair. The fact is that Hillary Clinton, not Donald Trump, should get credit for helping to shape the contours of the administration that she’s been preparing for her entire career, of what Trump is most likely to give and least likely to take away.

Her secretary of state, who would be the first female president, was in Cleveland to campaign for Richard Cordray, Ohio’s Democratic gubernatorial candidate. She put in a call to Donald Trump.

President Obama called me and asked me to stay on as White House Chief of Staff. At the urging of Bill and Chelsea, I said I could handle the job one more year. — Nancy Pelosi (@NancyPelosi) January 23, 2017

This week I continued working to help build the infrastructure of a Democratic majority in the House. In that spirit, I met today with the President of the United States to talk about the importance of bipartisan cooperation in Washington. The President has inspired so many young people with his vision of a better future. If Democrats are able to win the majority, we will serve the American people for a generation and give President Trump the chance to fulfill his promise of making America great again. Americans just may have the chance to do just that.

And while I’ve been working to move the House of Representatives closer to a majority, Bernie Sanders made some calls of his own to get things done in January and February. At one point, he told two senators – Democrat Brian Schatz of Hawaii and Republican Ron Johnson of Wisconsin – to spend five days doing the job of negotiating for comprehensive immigration reform. That was met with more than a little skepticism, in part because Schatz and Johnson had been nice to Republicans and didn’t want to step on anyone’s toes. So far, the White House has been more accommodating to bipartisan groups in which the Democrats have a disproportionate level of power over such big issues as infrastructure. But Democrats actually don’t have the votes to make all that much progress in the Senate, making the House their best bet. The benefits of bipartisanship go both ways. Hillary Clinton wants to continue working with Republicans to achieve her progressive priorities. If Democrats win a majority in the House, they will have President Trump to deal with and will lead a congressional majority with powerful House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler as its chair. The fact is that Hillary Clinton, not Donald Trump, should get credit for helping to shape the contours of the administration that she’s been preparing for her entire career, of what Trump is most likely to give and least likely to take away.

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